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Thread: Brake hard lines.

  1. #1
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    Default Brake hard lines.

    Anyone know where to buy the hard lines already pre bent for a 1990 grand marquis? Ive looked everywhere and could not find any. Thanks in advance

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  2. #2
    I'm an air-conditioned gypsy gadget73's Avatar
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    Pretty sure that doesnt and has never existed. Have to buy a roll and bend your own.

    86 Lincoln Town Car (Galactica).
    5.0 HO, CompCams XE258,Scorpion 1.72 roller rockers, 3.55 K code rear, tow package, BHPerformance ported E7 heads, Tmoss Explorer intake, 65mm throttle body, Hedman 1 5/8" headers, 2.5" dual exhaust, ASP underdrive pulley

    91 Lincoln Mark VII LSC SE, triple black (Timewarp) - poly front bushings, KYB struts and shocks, Holley SystemMax1 lower intake, SilverFox AOD valve body,

    1984 Lincoln Continental TurboDiesel - rolls coal

    Quote Originally Posted by phayzer5 View Post
    I drive a Lincoln. I can't be bothered to shift like the peasants and rabble rousers

  3. #3

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    If you don't trust your brake line flaring skills, buy a roll of copper-nickle (which bends by hand easily and doesn't kink if you're reasonably careful), mock them up in place, and have a local handy mechanic/friend flare the ends at their shop/home. I do it for friends from time to time; sometimes with the harder lines too, but the nice thing about the copper-nickel lines is they are soft enough to get into place and bend the ends while you're under a car that is just jacked up and not on a lift--so you don't have to deal with a 12 foot line with two tough-to-line-up ends while you're on your back with the line resting on your forehead and trying to use your foot to get the other end up against the frame rail and so on.

    Also, unions are handy. I don't like too many of them, but a non-leaking joint is as good as pipe and much, much easier to deal with than huge single pieces. No shame in breaking a big annoying job into a bunch of little annoying jobs, again--especially when you're one guy lying under the car.

  4. #4
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    Okay thanks guys. Since one line busted on me after installing my aluminum driveshaft, i might as well put new lines all around.

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  5. #5
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    Not the best pic but got some braided steel lines made for about $35 each. Going to wait until next check to get the rest of them.

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  6. #6
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    so these pliers are amazing, you can hand bend very close replicas. https://www.eastwood.com/ew-brake-forming-tool.html

  7. #7

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    Not a bad price for flexible line. Braided still swells with pressure and breaks over time; I don't know if the volume change from braking will give a weird pedal feel or if the minor flexing where it's routed will be an issue.
    As someone who lives in a rust state (where making brake lines is pretty routine) it always amazes me at how hard people will work, and how much they'll spend, to avoid buying some tubing and bending it into place.

    The brake hose in my '87 F150 failed at the rear axle last year. It was due for an inspection and I had an appointment the next day, so I just had the shop replace the line.
    They ended up replacing the line from about mid-transmission, to the hose, and to both wheel cylinders (which didn't need replacing). They also bled all the brakes and did an oil change.
    With the inspection, I think the whole job was under $200.

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    For me , i want to get my merc running. Been sitting at my parents house for about 4 months getting a new driveshaft and now brake lines. But i am planning a rear disc conversion and by then ill be switching to all new stainless steel brake lines. Thats why i just got the braided ones for the rear since it wont be such a pain in the ass to install.

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  9. #9
    I'm an air-conditioned gypsy gadget73's Avatar
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    Honestly its not that bad. If its just the lines on the axle you can make both of those up yourself in an hour or so. Its not exactly what I'd call fun work, but not precisely hard either. Getting the old line out and dealing with the rust and dirt falling in your face is honestly the worst part of it. Oh, and if your flare tool is a POS, that makes the job damn frustrating.

    86 Lincoln Town Car (Galactica).
    5.0 HO, CompCams XE258,Scorpion 1.72 roller rockers, 3.55 K code rear, tow package, BHPerformance ported E7 heads, Tmoss Explorer intake, 65mm throttle body, Hedman 1 5/8" headers, 2.5" dual exhaust, ASP underdrive pulley

    91 Lincoln Mark VII LSC SE, triple black (Timewarp) - poly front bushings, KYB struts and shocks, Holley SystemMax1 lower intake, SilverFox AOD valve body,

    1984 Lincoln Continental TurboDiesel - rolls coal

    Quote Originally Posted by phayzer5 View Post
    I drive a Lincoln. I can't be bothered to shift like the peasants and rabble rousers

  10. #10
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    Yeahh pain in the ass to get them off is right. Had to grind off the center brake hose bolt on top of the diff to get the lines out since for some odd reason they were already stripped out when i got to them.

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  11. #11
    I'm an air-conditioned gypsy gadget73's Avatar
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    the center bolt never comes out without a fight. My car still has the original end of the brake hose up there for that reason. I'm not using the original style plumbing so it wasn't important to remove it.

    86 Lincoln Town Car (Galactica).
    5.0 HO, CompCams XE258,Scorpion 1.72 roller rockers, 3.55 K code rear, tow package, BHPerformance ported E7 heads, Tmoss Explorer intake, 65mm throttle body, Hedman 1 5/8" headers, 2.5" dual exhaust, ASP underdrive pulley

    91 Lincoln Mark VII LSC SE, triple black (Timewarp) - poly front bushings, KYB struts and shocks, Holley SystemMax1 lower intake, SilverFox AOD valve body,

    1984 Lincoln Continental TurboDiesel - rolls coal

    Quote Originally Posted by phayzer5 View Post
    I drive a Lincoln. I can't be bothered to shift like the peasants and rabble rousers

  12. #12
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    Lucky you. I grinded it off while laying down under the car so i ended up burning a few hairs off. Wasnt a great idea putting a torx screw in there

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  13. #13
    I'm an air-conditioned gypsy gadget73's Avatar
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    I hate Torx bolts.

    86 Lincoln Town Car (Galactica).
    5.0 HO, CompCams XE258,Scorpion 1.72 roller rockers, 3.55 K code rear, tow package, BHPerformance ported E7 heads, Tmoss Explorer intake, 65mm throttle body, Hedman 1 5/8" headers, 2.5" dual exhaust, ASP underdrive pulley

    91 Lincoln Mark VII LSC SE, triple black (Timewarp) - poly front bushings, KYB struts and shocks, Holley SystemMax1 lower intake, SilverFox AOD valve body,

    1984 Lincoln Continental TurboDiesel - rolls coal

    Quote Originally Posted by phayzer5 View Post
    I drive a Lincoln. I can't be bothered to shift like the peasants and rabble rousers

  14. #14
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    Same. I even tried a set that i had bought from the tool truck thats supposed to grab onto the torx bolts to catch the stripped ones or prevent stripping and those didnt work. Extractor sockets got me no where either.

    Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk

  15. #15
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    Ever since I tried the copper nickel lines I haven't looked back. They are more money than steel but so much easier to work with and won't rust out.

  16. #16

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    On the F150, it apparently came out because the new one is installed with a hex head bolt in the original hole.
    On the CV, which I did on my own time, I used an inductive heater after grinding the top of the torx bolt off and removing the line.
    They're not cheap, but if you can buy/borrow/build an inductive heater, they are incredibly handy tools for old, corroded cars (and ships where we often can't have open flame tools).

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