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kishy's 1983 Grand Marquis 2dr

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  • gadget73
    replied
    lots of things have that pattern. Its something to do with the plastic between the layers. Honestly I'd leave it since its only a minor cosmetic issue and can only be seen in certain angles when the light is just so.

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  • kishy
    replied
    Summarizing the events since the last update:
    I aggressively wire brushed the bumper skin until the metal was quite clean. I did not opt for rust converter, instead, primed and painted the inside of the bumper. I think it ended up with 4 or 5 coats, all said and done, as I kept slapping more paint on it when I got bored and the last coat was fully dried.

    Somewhere in the mix, I installed replacement courtesy light sockets sourced from the blue junkyard '87 MGM. Interestingly, the sockets changed in the 80s, for no particularly good reason that I can identify.



    As for the inner/backing section of the bumper, it was also fairly rusty but only in select spots, but with no real depth to the rust. I wire wheeled most of that to clean it up just a little, and slapped a coat of paint on the inside-facing surface (the side that faces towards, and forms a cavity with the outer half).





    I also wire wheeled the mounting pads on the car, and slapped a coat of paint on each of those.



    Completely unrelated to anything: the rear window glass has this weird spotty pattern to it. As best I can tell, there's no way to make it go away. I'm guessing replacement glass is the only solution.



    On a different topic, this car has been incredibly hard to start. I had assumed this was all carb-related, but tonight after what had to be 20 minutes of on-and-off cranking and messing with the carb, I concluded that it was in fact getting fuel, and the plugs were not fouled. I dug around for a spark tester and found there was none.

    Attached (not installed, just sitting on top of stuff) a good-used coil I had hanging around. No change.
    Attached an unknown-working-order used Duraspark module I had hanging around. It immediately fired and started with no fuss at all. Brilliant.



    After the car started, I was able to move it to a spot that was more friendly to installing a bumper, and proceeded.​

    I reassembled the bumper, which involved finding a solution for the ruined bumperette. I drove a lag screw into it and it seems to be doing the job appropriately. I then put the bumper on the car (if you've never laid on the ground trying to bench press one of these into position, it takes some strength evidently). The positioning is pretty close to right and I'm happy with it. I cleaned up some paint that made it onto the chromed surface, hit it with some chrome polish, and it really looks quite nice now.





    Moving on from that, to what started this whole mess: the trailer hitch. The hitch is on, aligned pretty well with the trunk emblem for centering purposes, and the fasteners are torqued. Done.





    In the meantime of all this being done, I bought two additional trailer light power modules, so I have 3 on-hand, for my 3 vehicles needing them (84 LTC has a trailer connector wired directly into the tail lights, 91 MGM has no trailer connector yet, 83 MGM has no trailer connector yet). That will come another day, as it involves pulling a wire from the battery to the back of the car.

    When I started it to move it off the ramps and park it, it started without hesitation, however the charge warning light is on. It ran for a couple minutes but then suddenly died once it was off the ramps. I could not convince it to wake up again, so I just pushed it into where I wanted it and decided to deal with it another day. I do have a feeling that 1/8 tank indicated on the gauge is actually below the pickup tube, and it's currently pretty close to that, so it may just be functionally out of gas. The charge light is another issue - multimeter showed it was charging though, so I believe that makes the likely culprit the stator wire.

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  • DerekTheGreat
    replied
    Originally posted by gadget73 View Post
    procrastinators unite!.. later

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  • gadget73
    replied
    procrastinators unite!.. later

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  • DerekTheGreat
    replied
    If it's that high, I concede. I don't know if my lazy ass would worry about it within the next 3 to 5 years though. Although I have found the best time to get something done and out of the way is while it's fresh on the mind.

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  • kishy
    replied
    Originally posted by DerekTheGreat View Post

    Once you take the piece out of the elements (wild) it'll last decades. Unless your garage is 60%+ humidity year round, the salt won't do much on it's own. Source: I'm in the anti corrosion business.
    I'd estimate it's in excess of 60% RH for about half to two third of the year. Whatever our weather outside is - which today happens to be 75% and as you know, that's pretty typical.

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  • DerekTheGreat
    replied
    Originally posted by kishy View Post

    Decades? Have you never seen a box Panther in the wild?

    It is exceedingly rare to find the steel rear bumpers not rusted through. The ones I have in storage could be 95% of the way there. If they're packed with dirt including old salt, it'll keep going despite being in storage.

    The aluminum ones seem to suffer different failures; the skin stays alright but the inner piece just disappears until it falls off of the car.
    Once you take the piece out of the elements (wild) it'll last decades. Unless your garage is 60%+ humidity year round, the salt won't do much on it's own. Source: I'm in the anti corrosion business.

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  • gadget73
    replied
    or it just grows aluminum oxide until it pushes the chrome off in big chunks.

    The original rear bumper on my Towncar was rotted out 20 years ago.

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  • kishy
    replied
    Originally posted by DerekTheGreat View Post
    I'd clean them up on an "as needed" basis. Rust never sleeps, but it'll be decades before those bumpers rust through.
    Decades? Have you never seen a box Panther in the wild?

    It is exceedingly rare to find the steel rear bumpers not rusted through. The ones I have in storage could be 95% of the way there. If they're packed with dirt including old salt, it'll keep going despite being in storage.

    The aluminum ones seem to suffer different failures; the skin stays alright but the inner piece just disappears until it falls off of the car.

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  • DerekTheGreat
    replied
    I'd clean them up on an "as needed" basis. Rust never sleeps, but it'll be decades before those bumpers rust through.

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  • kishy
    replied
    I spent only a short time tonight messing with the bumper, but I did want to at least do something with it.
    I removed the bumperettes. One came off without incident. For the other, the threads jammed up and the stud came out of the bumperette. This technically ruins the bumperette but we'll see what I can cook up to solve it. I'm also pretty sure I have a couple hanging around somewhere, plus the ones on my spare bumpers, which are now pretty numerous.



    I used a hammer and chisel to break up some of the more layered looking rust, which I would estimate goes around 60% of the way through the steel. There are still more chunks to try to break off. The problem with just leaving it and trying to apply solutions on top of it is that there could be salt inside the layers, and salt plus even the tiniest bit of water (like humidity in an air pocket) would enable it to keep going underneath the paint.



    I put a wire brush on my grinder and cleaned up the rest of it somewhat. Still more to do, but I'm confident I've caught it in time to be successful. I'm not aiming for perfect but I do want to eliminate any hidden cavities. I definitely think an upgrade to the Milwaukee Fuel brushless grinder is in order - the brushed one gets quite hot and powers off. Either a thermal or overcurrent protection feature is kicking in, and I'm not really being all that hard on it.





    This whole sub-project is making me think that I should probably rip apart all my spare bumpers and, if nothing else, clean them, because they'll be no good if they rot from the inside out in storage.

    As for the soldering iron and heat gun, that was from the sequential turn signal wiring. No photos because it's hideous. It's a retrofit of a retrofit of a retrofit and because it's not done, nothing is neatly tucked in loom or anything, so the trunk is just full of wires everywhere. But the lights work, which was what I was going for.
    Last edited by kishy; 06-04-2024, 11:13 PM.

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  • gadget73
    replied
    The current pair of bumpers on the Continental got the same treatment. Similar inner/outer skin sort of deal. Did the same sort of de-scale and used rust converter and Eastwood's equivalent of POR-15 to hopefully stop it. I still have the original rust-free bumpers but the chrome is in pretty sad shape. If the shiny but rusty ones rust through they will get re-installed.

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  • Tiggie
    replied
    Had to go through the bumper treatment on the old 82. Used the rust converter. I swear that inner steel bumper was raw steel when it was assembled. Luckily both wagons are equipped with aluminum bang guards.

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  • 87gtVIC
    replied
    Nice work. I have taken apart a number of the bumper chrome to inner skins and they are never fun to do. Definitely tedious after all these years up north.


    out of curiosity what was the heat gun and soldering iron used for? Did you do the trailer wiring also?
    Last edited by 87gtVIC; 06-04-2024, 06:04 PM. Reason: Added thought.

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  • DerekTheGreat
    replied
    The Fixx.. Good tune, sounds great on the hi-fi.

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