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Thread: Oil Filter Change Tool

  1. #1
    Member of the Orb Alliance packman's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Oil Filter Change Tool

    Sorry for the lack of a better name for this thread. So, I don't know about any of you out there; but the first time I changed the oil in my '05 MGM was a freakin mess! I thought the '86 CV was bad; and then Ford made it much worse. So when you spin that filter off; it's supposed to pour out onto a plastic channel that directs the oil alongside the steering rack and out of a spout-looking thing. The problem is that some oil takes that route; but most of it takes other less resistant paths (like onto the steering rack itself). It took a couple more oil changes to figure out a better way (IMO). After realizing that I needed to reroute the oil; I dug into the recycling bin and discovered that cutting an empty seltzer bottle in half and laying right under the oil filter would accomplish the objective. Just point it out towards the front of the car and 99% of the oil will run out the bottle spout and into your dirty oil basin (or whatever you use). When you have removed the oil filter, carefully pull the half bottle forward over the sway bar and point it down to drain what's leftover in the half-bottle. Then you're good to go.

    This is a very simple solution, but it works for me. What do you guys do when changing your oil filters? I know somebody has to have a better way.

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  2. #2
    Road Warrior Kodachrome Wolf's Avatar
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    Lucky yours even has the little spout thing, shame it's ineffective sounding. I was wondering why on earth Ford would design the oil filter to drain onto the steering rack on the '03+ cars when I was doing the oil change on my roommate's Town Car. Guess I have a new method of attack as I've never considered a way to re-route it.

    The -'02 stuff doesn't make as much of a mess. It does pour a little on the center link, but a quick wipe with a rag and its clean again.

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  3. #3
    I'm an air-conditioned gypsy gadget73's Avatar
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    Once in a while you see afterthought engineering in full effect. The 03+ chassis re-design didn't go along with any change to the engine, so you get the same filter location with completely different underneath bits. A nicer fix would have been to remote-mount the oil filter someplace that doesn't cause any fuss or mess but I guess they cheaped out and stuck a little plastic flap in there as a feel-good measure.

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  4. #4
    fomoco panthers !
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    I like your filter wrench. Any idea who makes /made it ? It looks like something well made in the USA that is forty years old.

  5. #5
    Member of the Orb Alliance packman's Avatar
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    Mainemantom: my bad; I meant to reply earlier, but got caught up with the CV. The filter wrench is K-D Manufacturing Co. part# 2029. Yes, it is 50 sumtin years old. My Dad was using it when he was in his late teens. He mentioned using it on The Rocket ('57 Plymouth Fury w/ a swapped 413 wedge). I will dig up the smaller version sometime this week. One this for sure; it's well oiled LOL

  6. #6
    Member tbear853's Avatar
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    I knew it was K-D ... stuff looks like it can do the job alone.
    No ... I'm not arguing with you ... I'm just explaining why I'm right ...

    Now go ... and whatever you do ... have a safe trip!

  7. #7
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    I use a strap wrench made by snap on.
    Also there are flexible funnels that make this job much easier

    https://www.calcarcover.com/product/...ning-tool/1381
    ..

  8. #8
    fomoco panthers !
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    Quote Originally Posted by packman View Post
    Mainemantom: my bad; I meant to reply earlier, but got caught up with the CV. The filter wrench is K-D Manufacturing Co. part# 2029. Yes, it is 50 sumtin years old. My Dad was using it when he was in his late teens. He mentioned using it on The Rocket ('57 Plymouth Fury w/ a swapped 413 wedge). I will dig up the smaller version sometime this week. One this for sure; it's well oiled LOL
    Thanks for the reply. I have located both the large and small wrenches for sale.

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